February 2017

7 March 2017

February began in Schenectady for a weeklong work event. After spending time with peers, I got to ski on my first non-Michigan mountain. So, my first mountain. After New York, I flew back to my apartment in New Orleans and moved out my remaining possessions in the morning. It was good to leave. As much as appreciated the character of New Orleans, living next to Canal and Bourbon Street wasn’t a good fit for me. Too much vomit on the sidewalks, music in the streets, and crowds. If I live in the area again, I’ll keep some distance from tourist territory.

 

I spent the day driving through Louisiana toward Shreveport. I stopped at Driskill Mountain as dusk fell and capped my 24th highpoint. The relative elevation and surrounding hardwood forest impressed me. After leaving, I drove through Texas and slept at rest area outside of Dallas. It was the first time I slept in my truck in almost two years, so it was a much-needed night. In the morning, I continued across Texas, marveling at the unexpected scenery–a hillside littered in nothing but truck beds and the coexistence of oil wells, wind turbines, and beef cattle. I entered New Mexico, stopped at a curio shop along Route 66, and bought a horsehair hoodie. That night, I wimped out, got a hotel, ate at Denny’s, and soaked in the hot tub.

 

The next day, I kept trucking through Arizona. The curvy and pothole-ridden roads that wound through the snowy, coniferous mountains of Flagstaff threw me off guard. If I didn’t know better, I’d have thought I was in Montana. As the sun was setting, I crossed the Colorado River to California. Interestingly, there was an agricultural border patrol. Thankfully, they permitted my palm trees and bamboo plants. The trip would have been for naught otherwise. That evening, I slept in another rest area near Bakersfield. It was incredibly windy. I could feel it against the truck as I lied down. The dull white noise relaxed me.

 

On the fourth day, I finished my 2,200 mile journey to San Ramon. On the final stretch of the trip, I enjoyed the rolling green hills–finally relieved from the seven-year drought–and the countless wind turbines they hosted. I moved into my apartment and re-acquainted myself with the Bay Area–from the bag-less grocery shopping to the self-absorbed residents. In the remaining days of the month, I settled into my new home and new job. My truck, having now earned the name “Old Faithful,” received a well-deserved break as I incorporated biking into my daily commute and default mode of transportation. With a recreational trail behind my apartment and work and a BART station no more than 5 miles away, I can reach most anywhere I need via bike. This is great physically, economically, and environmentally and something I’d like to keep up wherever I live in the future.

 

The stark contrast between New Orleans and the Bay Area is something to note. New Orleans–despite being dirty, chaotic, and rampant with questionable infrastructure–had rich culture, enjoyment, and friendly people. It was very human. The Bay Area is the opposite. It is clean, efficient, and orderly. While there is plenty to do and enjoy, the people are not as friendly–more self-important and terse in interactions–and there is little culture or identity. I will enjoy living in the land of the robots, but I will miss the humanness of New Orleans.