June 2017

16 July 2017

Northern California is brown now. The rolling green hills of winter and spring have turned dry–the plants shriveled and dull, ground hard and cracked. During my first week here, I took my bike up and down green slopes. The earth was so wet that I ended up sliding face first in the mud. This June, I biked through the hills again, over earth so dry that I was nearly vibrated off the trail. The weather change may be minor, but the seasonal climate shift is nothing to scoff at.

 

Short of work and biking; I had a quick trip to Atlanta. It was the first time I had flown in several months, and I had the pleasure of spending long layovers in new airports. Sarcasm withheld, I am quite fond of long layovers. Once through security and not late for a flight, airports are relaxing. There’s plenty of time to read, think, and people watch. The anticipation of the flight to come is exciting, and there’s always a conveyor belt to walk on.

 

Despite the anticipation, the Atlanta trip was a net loss since I dropped my phone in Lake Lanier. Unable to retrieve it–despite the Otter Box probably keeping it perfectly dry–I upgraded to the iPhone 7 when I came home. Short of the missing audio jack (improved aesthetics and impetus to buy AirPods), there was nothing notably different than the 6. t was due for an upgrade anyway.

 

Beyond a technology upgrade, I enhanced a few other things. One, the premium version of Spotify–convenience and quality well worth the monthly fee. Two, a subscription to The Economist–well worth the limited ads and world news. Three, a loss of my best never-have-I-ever: I drank coffee. Black. At a little diner in Eastern California, I had my first taste of the world’s life fuel. What’s more, I actually liked it. It was plain, bitter, and got my mind rolling much quicker than it normally does in the morning. Haven’t had a sip since, but I’ll consider working it into my routine. Why limit myself? While self-denial can be a differentiator and bolster of strength in some regards, other limitations are just silly.